Designing Football, from Helmets to Hashtags

football field
Dimensions of a professional football field (image: 2011 Official Playing Rules And Casebook of the NFL)

Sports are good design. American football is no exception: helmets are perhaps the most highly engineered piece of protective equipment in professional sports; the football field is unique in that it’s not designed to accommodate a ball, but to serve as a metric of progress in a battle for territory; the ball itself is an index of the game’s evolution, shrouded in myth and hearsay. It’s taken more than 100 years for professional football to become the game we know today and that history is embedded in the design of its fields, stadiums, and equipment. I recently wrote a threepart series investigating this design history for Design Decoded and learned some surprising facts about America’s favorite sport, including the rationale behind the so-called Boise Rule, which mandates turf color, and the link between naval paratroopers, cobblers, & college football.

Read my three-part design history of football on Design Decoded:

The Ruins of San Francisco’s Sutro Baths


Gloomy San Francisco Days are always good for exploring ruins. This week, on a particularly grey and windy day, a friend and I took a stroll through the Sutro Baths in San Francisco…or at least what’s left of them. If I were making a low-budge, post-apocalyptic student film, I would probably use the site as my primary location. It’s been 40 years since the baths burned down, but what remains still has a definite ground-zero vibe. Mysterious pieces of concrete and brick walls jut out of the hillside growth and unusual sand formations. Navigating the site can be tricky—as Maude will surely attest—with pieces of bent, rusted metal and concrete holes aiming to trip up careless explorers. When the Sutro Baths opened in 1896, it was the world’s largest indoor swimming hole — complete with 7 different pools, a private museum and 8,000 seat concert hall. Continue reading The Ruins of San Francisco’s Sutro Baths