Categories
Architecture

Maurizio Cattelan: If that’s ‘All’ there is my friends…

The Maurizio Cattelan exhibition ALL ended its run at the Guggenheim last weekend and I wanted to share some quick thoughts about the show, especially in light of what seems to have been a mostly negative reception from some of our more prominent art critics. But more than that, I’m also hoping that by posting what is little more than a few ill-informed observations jotted down in a notebook about an artist whose work I had never seen before stepping into Frank Lloyd Wright’s atrium late last year, I’ll instigate a bit of a sea change for Life Without Buildings. Basically, I want it to be more fun. After years of hard work and school, writing architectural history has actually become an honest-to-god, bill-paying job and now more than ever I need a place to experiment with different forms of criticism and documentation, to work out new projects, to make mistakes, and to write about things that are little less serious. This will be that place. So that’s happening.

But back to the Cattelan show. I loved it.

Categories
Architecture

Inflate and Imbibe: Art and Architecture meet in a New Orleans Courtyard

[Des Cours Installation, original photo]

In December, I participated in Des Cours, a week-long art exhibition in New Orleans organized by The Big Easy’s chapter of the American Institute of Architects. A team made up of Fred Stivers, Sergio Padilla, and myself was invited with twelve other international teams of artists and architects to create installations in thirteen courtyards throughout downtown New Orleans. The spaces of Des Cours are private, hidden spaces. Spaces often unknown by the hundreds – if not thousands – of people who walk by them every day. Des Cours encourages artists to create installations that use new materials, methods, technology and interactivity to present a unique opportunity for viewing contemporary design within a historic setting. Our submittal: a nearly 100-foot-long inflatable structure in Tennessee Williams’ old courtyard.